Modern Papua New Guinea

By Laura Zimmer-Tamakoshi | Go to book overview

David King


ELITES, SUBURBAN COMMUTERS, AND
SQUATTERS
The Emerging Urban Morphology of
Papua New Guinea

THE IMAGE OF MODERN Papua New Guinea is an urban image. Despite the fact that the rural sector is also changing rapidly, the growth of the big towns and cities offers all that is new and exciting as well as that which is dangerous, negative, and squalid. Shopping centres multiply, offering a dazzling array of goods and luxury items. High-rise office buildings are beginning to dominate the central business districts, prestigious elite areas are increasingly localised, with all of the consequential changes in attitudes and lifestyles of the new middle class, and traffic jams symbolise the newly mobile urban population. Alongside television, football teams, and discos are the ever-present urban problems of unacceptably high crime rates, and a chronic shortage of housing that results in high occupancy rates, overcrowding, squatter settlements, and domestic violence.

The ambivalence of the people towards the towns that they occupy is as strong more than two decades after independence as it was during the late colonial period, when the Levines (1980) reviewed the attitudes, adaptations, and general dissatisfaction of ‘ambivalent townsmen’. The towns have become bigger, and less obviously colonial, but they remain difficult places in which to live. However, most of the postcolonial expansion in the labour force has taken place in the urban sector. Once an individual is educated past grade six there is little apparent opportunity in the rural sector, except for the limited areas where a strong rural cash-crop economy has developed. Besides, most of these

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Modern Papua New Guinea
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.