Modern Papua New Guinea

By Laura Zimmer-Tamakoshi | Go to book overview

Part Four
THE PEOPLE'S WELFARE

PAPVA NEW GUINEANS' INVOLVEMENT with the outside world has resulted in problems and opportunities that challenge both old and new cultural imaginations and the small political scale of most Melanesian societies (Smith 1994; Kirsch 1997). From communal safety nets to urban crime and rural poverty, from medical systems focused on restoring social relations to one requiring mass inoculations and the monitoring of such new diseases as AIDS and diabetes, and from small-scale farming to large-scale developments and environmental destruction, Papua New Guineans must make decisions about a future that is contested and only partly under their control. How to harmonize, for example, the people's desire and need to secure the land for future generations with their own and the government's commoditization of the environment and the selling off of Papua New Guinea's natural resources? Or how to understand and satisfy the conflicting interests of men and women when they live in a world in which, on the one hand, a western-educated Papua New Guinean man might yet feel himself a victim of his wife's treachery and sorcery when she suffers a miscarriage and, on the other, a young village girl, having been exposed to western ideas through her experiences at a mission school, might dream of having a new kind of relationship with her future husband. In the following chapters, education is highlighted as a primary means for Papua New Guineans to handle the challenges they face. One compelling challenge is improving the distribution and quality of health care to more equitably care for the needs of persons living in rural areas of

-253-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Modern Papua New Guinea
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.