Framing the Family: Narrative and Representation in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods

By Rosalynn Voaden; Diane Wolfthal | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Just as a medieval manuscript is the product of a team of scribes, illuminators, rubricators, and patrons, so this volume is the result of the efforts of many. We are grateful to the following divisions of Arizona State University for their generous financial support of the initial symposium “Framing the Family: Representation and Narrative in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods,” which was held at ASU on 2–3 March, 2002: the Graduate College, Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the College of Fine Arts, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Department of English, the Department of Women's Studies, the School of Art, and the Harold and Jean Grossman Professorship of Jewish Studies in the Department of Religious Studies. We also wish to express our appreciation to the graduate students who worked so hard to make the conference a success: Vanessa Chrzan, Bryan Curd, Lisa Makros, Kristen McQuinn, Katie Meier, Carol Mejia-LaPerle, Jennifer Michaud, Chris Perry, and Stephanie Volf. We also are extremely grateful to the members of the Editorial Committee, Carol Mejia-LaPerle and Chris Perry, for their generous and astute assistance in the preparation of this manuscript. In addition, this volume would not have been possible without the generosity of many anonymous reviewers. We also wish to thank the Director and General Editor Robert E. Bjork, the Manager of Design and Production Dorothy Bungert, and the Managing Editor Roy Rukkila of Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies for expediting the publication of this volume, and Leslie MacCoull for her careful and expert editing. To our partners, Martin Levin and Maurice Wolfthal, we are grateful for their encouragement, patience, support, and advice. Collaborative projects are the test of a true friendship, and the process of organizing the conference and editing the essays only strengthened ours. We dedicate this volume to our own families: Bob and Jean Voaden, Rob Voaden, Angela Voaden, Dr. Howard and Elaine Maltz, and Larry and Debbie Fialkow.

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