Richard Hooker and the Construction of Christian Community

By Arthur Stephen McGrade | Go to book overview

W. J. TORRANCE KIRBY


Richard Hooker as an Apologist of the
Magisterial Reformation in England

EVER SINCE THE PUBLICATION IN 1599 OF A Christian Letter1 there has been some controversy over Richard Hooker's commitment to the fundamental tenets of Reformation theology, especially as defined by the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England.2 The anonymous authors of this letter, who declared themselves to be “certaine English Protestantes, unfayned favourers of the present state of religion, authorized and professed in England” sought to impugn Hooker's doctrinal assumptions as incompatible with the Thirty-nine Articles and thus at odds with reformed orthodoxy itself.3 Referring to Hooker's Preface to the Lawes, they charged that,

you did bende all your skill and force against the present state of
our English church: and by colour of defending the discipline and
gouvernement thereof, to make questionable and bring in con-
tempt the doctrine and faith it seife. (FLE 4:7.11–12, 19–20)

11 The complete text of A.C.L is included in the Folger edition of Hooker's works, FLE 4:1–79.

2 The Thirty-nine Articles bear the full title of Articles agreed upon by the Archbishops and Bishops of both Provinces and the whole clergy, in the Convocation holden at London in die year 1562, for the avoiding of diversities of opinions, and for the establishing of consent touching true religion.

3 John Booty discusses the question of authorship of A.C.L. in his introduction, FLE 4:xvii–xxv.

-219-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Richard Hooker and the Construction of Christian Community
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 420

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.