Trajectories through the New Testament and the Apostolic Fathers

By Andrew F. Gregory; Christopher M. Tuckett | Go to book overview

9
Prophecy and Patronage: The Relationship
between Charismatic Functionaries and
Household Officers in Early Christianity

Alistair Stewart-Sykes

During the nineteenth century, and throughout the twentieth, a consensus was built that office as such did not exist in early Christianity but developed at a later stage. This consensus has been described at length by Burtchaell and by Brockhaus,1 and for this reason there will be no attempt to repeat the description at any length. In essence the consensus holds not only that the earliest generation of Christians knew no office and that the emergence of offices was a later development, but that in the absence of any office, congregations were ordered by the Spirit in an unmediated manner. Of course there is great variety of detail amongst exponents of the consensus, but this brief statement will suffice for the present.

The consensus has recently received thoroughgoing critiques from Burtchaell, basing himself on the assumption that the structures of early Christianity must have derived from the synagogue, and thus that they could not have emerged later but must have been present from the beginning,2 and from Campbell, who bases himself on the Pauline and deutero-Pauline evidence, again suggesting that office was present in the church’s organization from the beginning.3 Whereas these are adequate critiques of the more extreme forms of the consensus, as represented, for instance, by von Campenhausen and Käsemann,4 they do not deal with the question of potential conflict between these offices and those exercising charisma, except in so far as Burtchaell

1 J. T. Burtchaell, From Synagogue to Church: Public Services and Offices in the Earliest Christian Communities (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992), 61–179; U. Brockhaus, Charisma und Amt: die paulinische Charismenlehre auf dem Hintergrund der frühchristlichen Gemeindefunktionen (Wuppertal: Rolf Brockhaus, 1972), 7–94.

2 Burtchaell, From Synagogue to Church.

3 R. A. Campbell, The Elders (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1994).

4 H. von Campenhausen, Ecclesiastical Authority and Spiritual Power in the Church of the First Three Centuries (ET Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1969); E. Käsemann, ‘Ministry

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Trajectories through the New Testament and the Apostolic Fathers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 506

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.