Hearst over Hollywood: Power, Passion, and Propaganda in the Movies

By Louis Pizzitola | Go to book overview

8
Trader
1914–1918

WIRELESS

In the fall of 1914, through the auspices of the International News Service, the Hearst newspaper chain published a dramatic photograph of a capsized British battleship, the S.S. Audacious, that had been wrecked by a German torpedo. Until that moment, England, maintaining a strict control of war news because of its virtual monopoly on cable communications, had repeatedly denied that the sinking had occurred. It was now confronted with the black-and-white newsprint truth, and it was humiliated. The British-born George Allison, Hearst's INS man in London since 1912, had obtained the pictures of the H.M.S. Audacious. Allison was charged with keeping a steady flow of illustrations going to the New York office. “There was a wild scramble for photographs of anything appertaining to war,” he recalled, “soldiers, weapons, ships, aircraft and the rest of the panoply. I contacted every photographic agency in London and asked them to submit photographs.”

Later, Allison acknowledged that the Audacious photographs came to him more through “luck and chance” than through hard work. One day, at the bar of London's Press Club, Allison struck up a conversation with a man who was waiting for an appointment with a Belfast newspaper editor. Several drinks later Allison realized there was no sign of the editor. Allison's companion suggested that one possible reason for the delay was his editor

-135-

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Hearst over Hollywood: Power, Passion, and Propaganda in the Movies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Film and Culture - A Series of Columbia University Press ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • 1 - Behind the Scenes 1880S–1890S 1
  • 2 - The Artist Journalist 1895–1898 17
  • 3 - Film News 1898–1906 40
  • 4 - Midium for a New Cntury 1900–1907 73
  • 5 - It Pays Ot Advertise 94
  • 6 - When Men Betray 1915–1918 111
  • 7 - Perils of Passion 1915–1918 126
  • 8 - Trader 1914–1918 135
  • 9 - The Perils of Propaganda 1917–1918 148
  • 10 - Fits and Starts 1917–1919 162
  • 11 - Over Production 1919–1922 179
  • 12 - Fire and Smoke 1922–1925 207
  • 13 - Industry 1925–1929 230
  • 14 - Above the Law 1929–1934 260
  • 15 - Remote Control 1934–1940 326
  • 16 - Hollywood Isolationist 1940–1947 370
  • 17 - No Trespassing 1947–1951 419
  • Notes 443
  • Index 501
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