Stand, Columbia: A History of Columbia University in the City of New York, 1754-2004

By Robert A. McCaughey | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE

The most distinctive feature about Columbia's recorded history is its unevenness in quantity and quality. This applies equally to primary sources and secondary accounts, official and otherwise, as well as to its physical artifacts.

First, the good news. No nineteenth-century college left behind better direct access to its undergraduate life or trustee doings than did Columbia in the diaries of George Templeton Strong. Similarly, the oral histories compiled by the Oral History Research Office within days of the tumultuous events of April 1968, along with the transcripts of the Cox commission and the journalistic efforts of the staff of the Columbia Daily Spectator, constitute an unparalleled source for observing a great university in the act of unraveling.

As for secondary accounts of parts of Columbia's history, David C. Humphrey's From King's College to Columbia, 1746–1800 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1976) is as good a telling of a colonial college's founding and first half-century as we have. Nor has any twentieth-century university been better served by its architectural historians than has Columbia by Andrew S. Dolkart's Morningside Heights: A History of Its Architecture and Development (New York: Columbia University Press, 1998) and Barry Bergdoll's Mastering McKim's Plan: Columbia's First Century on Morningside Heights (New York: Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery, Columbia University, 1997). Travis B. Jacobs's Eisenhower at Columbia (New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction, 2001) is a solid and unflinching account of a single presidency, while Harold Wechsler's The Qualified Student: A History of Selective College Admission in America, 1870–1970 (New York: Wiley, 1977) is a sensitive and discerning treatment of Columbia's not-so-distant history of anti-Semitism. Rosalind Rosenberg's Changing the Subject: A History of Women at Columbia (Columbia University Press, forthcoming) should immediately supersede the treatment accorded her subject here, as should Michael Rosenthal's forthcoming biography of Nicholas Murray Butler.

It is also Columbia's good fortune that the accounts of the Columbia Core by Jacques Barzun (A College Plan in Action: A Review of Working Principles at Columbia College [New York: Columbia University Press, 1946]), Daniel Bell (The Reforming of General Education: The Columbia College Experience in Its National Setting ([New York: Columbia University Press, 1966; reprint, New York: Anchor, Doubleday, 1968]), Timothy P. Cross (An Oasis of Order: The Core Curriculum at Columbia College [New York: Columbia College, 1995]), and David Denby (Great Books: My Adventures with Homer, Rousseau, Woolf, and Other Indestructible Writers of the Western World [New York: Simon and Schuster, 1996]), however they differ in approach, all succeed in infusing Columbia's curricular history with life, sparkle, and intellectual import. Would that Columbia's still largely enshrouded financial history had received comparable attention.

Columbia's official histories constitute a mixed bag. The earliest of these histories, that by Clement Clark Moore (The Early History of Columbia College [1825; reprint, New York: Columbia University Press, 1940]), is little more than an anecdotal sketch appropriate to its first presentation, as a talk to the alumni. That of his nephew, Nathaniel F.

-685-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Stand, Columbia: A History of Columbia University in the City of New York, 1754-2004
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 718

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.