Cognitive Neuroscience of Aging: Linking Cognitive and Cerebral Aging

By Roberto Cabeza; Lars Nyberg et al. | Go to book overview

14
Age-Related Changes
in Hemispheric Organization

Sander Daselaar Roberto Cabeza

What are the implications for cognition of the fact that we have two cerebral hemispheres? Although this is one of the most fundamental questions in cognitive neuroscience, no definite answer is presently available. For more than a century, researchers have wondered why we have two hemispheres, how they differ, and how they interact with each other. Anatomical and functional asymmetries have been identified, and different models of hemispheric interaction have been proposed. Studies using positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have revitalized this research domain by discovering new hemispheric asymmetries. Moreover, these studies have identified changes in the lateralization of brain activity as a function of population variables, such as aging. In fact, the most consistent finding in functional neuroimaging studies of cognitive aging is a reduction in the lateralization of prefrontal activations. This is not the first time that aging has been associated with changes in lateralization; for many years, cognitive aging psychologists discussed the possibility that the right hemisphere ages faster than the left. In general, however, these ideas have not been informed by theories regarding hemispheric specialization and interaction. The goal of this chapter is to address this disconnection and to link the topic of lateralization and aging to general issues regarding hemispheric organization.

The chapter has three main sections. The first section focuses on hemispheric organization. It reviews evidence concerning hemispheric specialization, at both anatomical and functional levels, and then describes three views of hemispheric interaction: insulation, inhibition, and cooperation. The second section describes two models concerning age-related changes in lateralization: the right hemiaging model and the age-related asymmetry reduction model. Evidence supporting each model is reviewed, and the two models are compared. Finally, the third section links the first

-325-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cognitive Neuroscience of Aging: Linking Cognitive and Cerebral Aging
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 400

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.