It's not Just Growing Pains: A Guide to Childhood Muscle, Bone, and Joint Pain, Rheumatic Diseases, and the Latest Treatments

By Thomas J. A. Lehman | Go to book overview

19
Fibromyalgia and
Chronic Fatigue
Syndrome

THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW

The most important thing to remember in evaluating a child with fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome is to be sure the diagnosis is correct. Although these are complex syndromes that may be difficult to treat, many of the children who come to me who were originally diagnosed with these diseases had not gotten better because fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue were not the correct diagnosis. Every child with chronic pain and fatigue deserves a complete and thorough diagnostic evaluation. There should not be any significant laboratory abnormalities in children with either fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue.

Sue Ellen was a sixteen-year-old who complained of fatigue and weak-
ness. She was unable to go to school because she could not get out of
bed in the morning, complaining of hurting all over. Six months previ-
ously she had developed a severe viral infection with fever, rash, and
diffuse aches and pains. Although the fever and rash had resolved
within a week, she had never regained her strength. She had been
seen by several physicians and had been treated for Lyme disease—
despite negative blood tests—without response. A thorough physical
examination and comprehensive testing found no abnormalities ex-
cept for multiple trigger points (areas of the muscle that when com-
pressed cause pain). It was carefully explained to Sue Ellen and her
family that we would have to all work together to make her better.
With the help of parents, family, and friends, a program of steadily
increasing activities and school attendance was devised. She often

-242-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
It's not Just Growing Pains: A Guide to Childhood Muscle, Bone, and Joint Pain, Rheumatic Diseases, and the Latest Treatments
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 416

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.