It's not Just Growing Pains: A Guide to Childhood Muscle, Bone, and Joint Pain, Rheumatic Diseases, and the Latest Treatments

By Thomas J. A. Lehman | Go to book overview

27
Getting the Best
Results for Your Child

After I get a family settled down and the child’s care on the right track,
someone frequently asks, “Why do I have to come back so often?” I
always compare this to making soup. Anyone can take down a cook-
book, read the soup recipe, and get two pounds of beef, a large onion,
a carrot, noodles, assorted seasonings, a good-sized pot, and a stove.
However, there is a lot of room for interpretation when the instruc-
tions say, “Cut up the beef and slice the carrot and onion thinly. Add
the ingredients to a large pot with water just to cover. Heat over me-
dium heat for two hours, adjust the seasonings and serve.”

To someone with a lot of experience making soup, those are ad-
equate instructions. If you make soup every day, you know exactly
how to do it to get the result you want. But compare two cooks. One
cook reads the book, finds the ingredients called for, puts them in a
pot of water, sets it on medium heat, and walks away for two hours.
The cook who makes soup all the time has picked exactly the beef,
onion, and carrot he or she wants and knows how to prepare them for
the soup. After the pot is on the stove, the experienced cook checks
the soup every ten to fifteen minutes, adjusts the heat, tastes the sea-
sonings, and makes all the other small adjustments that come from
experience. Which cook do you think is likely to make the better soup?
Similarly, your child’s health requires continual monitoring, reevalua-
tion, and adjustments for the best outcome.

This is the most important chapter of this book. Everyone wants the best results for his or her child, but not everyone understands that you have to go out and get them. Reading this book means you are off to a good start. You are looking at this book because you want more information. If you were planning a vacation to Hawaii, it would not be a good idea simply to call the

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