America's First Olympics: The St. Louis Games of 1904

By George R. Matthews | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

It was a pleasure to conduct research in St. Louis, a pleasant city with many charms. The Missouri Historical Society Library, the premier repository for materials pertaining to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition and St. Louis Olympic games, is housed in a magnificent building. Forest Park, the site of the World’s Fair and only a short distance from the library, is a botanical paradise and the home for the Missouri Historical Society Museum. Exhibits, a bookstore, and an exquisite restaurant with spectacular panorama views of Forest Park are provided in the museum including the restored Grand Basin with waterfalls cascading down from Art Hill. Washington University, adjacent to Forest Park, has preserved the stadium and gymnasium structures used for the St. Louis Olympics.

My appreciation is extended to the helpful staffs of the Missouri Historical Society Library and Museum. Special appreciation goes to Jean E. Meeh Gosebrink at the St. Louis Public Library, Special Collections for her professional and courteous manner in locating photographs and other materials. Jim Greensfelder, spokesman, and his three co-authors, Bob Christiansen, Jim Lally, and Max Storm gave permission to reproduce photographs from their book 1904 Olympic Games Official Medals and Badges. Barney DePenaloza and family welcomed me to their home and provided a special photograph of great-grandfather Henri de Penaloza. The generosity and graciousness of Max Storm, past president of the 1904 World’s Fair Society, is greatly appreciated.

A gifted writer, Sandra Marshall, provided the inspiration, encouragement, and constant support without which this book would not have been possible. Always gently conveyed, she also rendered invaluable constructive criticism. Words alone cannot express the depth of my gratitude.

-ix-

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America's First Olympics: The St. Louis Games of 1904
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • A Tale of Two Cities 3
  • The Ghost of Plato 40
  • Transfer Accepted 93
  • St. Louis Olympian Games 113
  • Place in History 201
  • Notes 213
  • Bibliography 223
  • Index 231
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