Virtual Learning and Higher Education

By David Seth Preston | Go to book overview

Assessment for Real in Virtual Learning Environments -
How Far Can We Go?

Mike Fuller


Abstract

The use of tests is a common feature of Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs). Assessment tools in VLEs have frequently been regarded as limited to the reinforcement of basic skills and the lower levels of the cognitive domain. However the resource pressures that have lead to larger classes and to the use of VLEs also apply - perhaps particularly apply - to assessment.

This chapter takes an overview of the potential, as well as the problems, of assessing students’ learning using the tools of VLEs, so as to make cost-effective use of staff time. To what extent are the perceived weaknesses and limitations of assessment in a VLE inherent? Or with imagination and further development can we go beyond them? How far up the cognitive hierarchy can we go?

The chapter reviews the use of VLEs for assessment. Although informed by the author’s experience in using a VLE for assessing business students’ knowledge and understanding of quantitative methods, the chapter takes a broader, interdisciplinary perspective.

The conclusion is that while there are inherent limitations in the specific assessment tools of a VLE, there is underexploited potential for the resource-effective use of VLEs in a variety of assessment tasks in ways that develop rather than merely record student learning.

Consideration of the potential scope of VLEs for assessment raises some questions about Bloom’s taxonomy of the cognitive domain (Bloom et al, 1956). This consideration leads towards a perspective in which at the highest levels of the hierarchy Synthesis can be seen as more demanding than Evaluation. This is the reverse of the original ordering.


1. Computers and Assessment

Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) provide a range of facilities for delivering a module online, supplementing or replacing traditional modes of delivery. A VLE will typically provide curriculum mapping, structuring the curriculum into assessable components and a means of delivery of the module with additional links to external learning resources. There will also be facilities for: electronic communication between tutors and learners and between learners; provision of tutor support to learners; tracking of student participation and performance; support of online assessment (JISC, 2001; Erskine, 2003).

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Virtual Learning and Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 182

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.