Joaquin Murrieta: Life and Adventures of the Celebrated Bandit : His Exploits in the State of California

By Ireneo Paz; Francis P. Belle | Go to book overview

Chapter IV

When Joaquin returned to the Arroyo Cantova, decided upon beforehand for a meeting place, he found three or four hundred horses and mules brought by his companions, who were encamped, awaiting new orders. The chieftain dispatched some of them to take the animals to Sonora for better security. At the same time he sent the sum of five thousand dollars to be delivered to one of his secret agents, a resident of that state.

At the end of May he began to be bored. The inactivity was irksome. He began again his excursions along the highways, accompanied always by Gonzalez, Felix, Cardoza and the three women, who, mounted on magnificent horses, formed the handsomest trio of horsemen that any young man would ever imagine.

In the first ten days they met only some poor travelers who were going to the mines on foot. Joaquin’s purse was about empty, so that he resolved to fall upon the first person whom he should meet with the appearance of having any money. At nightfall there appeared a young man named Allen Ruddel, who was conducting a convoy of provisions. Joaquin left his friends behind, made his horse gallop toward Ruddel, and cutting across a field, he confronted him, and asked him to lend him all the money which he carried with him. Deceived perhaps by the youthful face of his questioner, the driver believed that he was accosted by a highwayman who was a novice at the work. He therefore responded to his request with a sneering smile, and urged his horses forward. Joaquin advanced toward him, and drawing his revolver, in a brusque and peremptory tone he ordered him to stop. Ruddel began to tremble and obeyed him.

“Now, friend,” said Joaquin in a very mild voice, “I only desire that you should lend me your money, for although I am a robber, I do not enjoy robbing a poor working man, and I swear to you, by my name of Joaquin, that I will return all that you lend me.”

Ruddel, instead of answering, made a sudden movement to draw

-18-

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Joaquin Murrieta: Life and Adventures of the Celebrated Bandit : His Exploits in the State of California
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • I - The Historical Joaquín xii
  • II - Biography xviii
  • III - Translation and Plagiarism of Ridge's Work xxv
  • IV - Joaquín Murrieta as Myth xxxvii
  • V - Joaquín Murrieta in Narrative Fiction xlviii
  • VI - Joaquín Murrieta in Poetry lix
  • VII - Joaquín Murrieta in Theater and Film lxviii
  • VIII - The Corrido of Joaquín Murrieta lxxviii
  • IX - This Edition xcvi
  • Notes xcviii
  • Bibliography cii
  • Chronology cxii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 7
  • Chapter III 13
  • Chapter IV 18
  • Chapter V 22
  • Chapter VI 29
  • Chapter VII 35
  • Chapter VIII 43
  • Chapter IX 48
  • Chapter X 54
  • Chapter XI 61
  • Chapter XII 65
  • Chapter XIII 69
  • Chapter XIV 72
  • Chapter XV 76
  • Chapter XVI 80
  • Chapter XVII 86
  • Chapter XVIII 90
  • Chapter XIX 94
  • Chapter XX 99
  • Chapter XXI 107
  • Chapter XXII 113
  • Chapter XXIII 118
  • Chapter XXIV 123
  • Chapter XXV 128
  • Chapter XXVI 135
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