Joaquin Murrieta: Life and Adventures of the Celebrated Bandit : His Exploits in the State of California

By Ireneo Paz; Francis P. Belle | Go to book overview

Chapter XIV

The journey did not distract Joaquin from his constant preoccupation. The memory of the last encounter with the Americans tormented him. Although he had completely routed them, he had paid dearly for his victory, and he realized the necessity of admitting the weakness of his own men before a strong enemy. He felt certain that their band was not composed of such skillful men as Jack Three Fingers, Valenzuela, Antonio and Guerra. Disturbed at letting Arkansaw escape, he also had to admit that Jack Three Fingers was not always invincible. Nevertheless, he was the strongest in the whole company, the most astute, the cruelest, the most audacious of all the bullies. Formerly, he had been a favorite and a right-hand man of Father Jarauta, that most famous bandit chief. Moreover, his service record was increased by his many wounds which he had received during his career, the scars of which could still be seen. This exalted him in Joaquin’s eyes. If this great champion had such great difficulty in escaping the clutches of the great intrepid Arkansaw, it was more than probable that any of the other bandits who had figured in that affair would have equal difficulty. Joaquin understood from this that it was to his interest to avoid a formal combat with the Americans. Such an encounter, even though he happened to be victorious, could deprive him of a great number of men whom it would be difficult to replace, which would greatly impede his original purpose.

This and other similar reflections kept Joaquin morose and silent. It was the first time that he felt a keen and sincere desire to renounce as soon as possible that criminal existence, and to retire and return to his mother country with his dear Clarita. That young girl was marching behind the company with her friends, who were far from sad. She did not feel the same misgivings as her lover and was in a very different humor. She was making an effort to distract and entertain her pretty companions, who liked above all things to be

-72-

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Joaquin Murrieta: Life and Adventures of the Celebrated Bandit : His Exploits in the State of California
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • I - The Historical Joaquín xii
  • II - Biography xviii
  • III - Translation and Plagiarism of Ridge's Work xxv
  • IV - Joaquín Murrieta as Myth xxxvii
  • V - Joaquín Murrieta in Narrative Fiction xlviii
  • VI - Joaquín Murrieta in Poetry lix
  • VII - Joaquín Murrieta in Theater and Film lxviii
  • VIII - The Corrido of Joaquín Murrieta lxxviii
  • IX - This Edition xcvi
  • Notes xcviii
  • Bibliography cii
  • Chronology cxii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 7
  • Chapter III 13
  • Chapter IV 18
  • Chapter V 22
  • Chapter VI 29
  • Chapter VII 35
  • Chapter VIII 43
  • Chapter IX 48
  • Chapter X 54
  • Chapter XI 61
  • Chapter XII 65
  • Chapter XIII 69
  • Chapter XIV 72
  • Chapter XV 76
  • Chapter XVI 80
  • Chapter XVII 86
  • Chapter XVIII 90
  • Chapter XIX 94
  • Chapter XX 99
  • Chapter XXI 107
  • Chapter XXII 113
  • Chapter XXIII 118
  • Chapter XXIV 123
  • Chapter XXV 128
  • Chapter XXVI 135
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