Menopause: A Biocultural Perspective

By Lynnette Leidy Sievert | Go to book overview

FIGURES
1.1.Life stages of the macaque, chimpanzee, and human3
1.2.Growth and development of an ovarian follicle11
1.3.The most often cited model of follicular depletion12
1.4.The true decline in numbers of ovarian follicles across the lifespan13
1.5.Evolutionary relationships17
1.6.A biocultural model for examining human variation19
1.7.Cultural and biological boundaries on female reproduction25
1.8.Ages at tubal ligation, hysterectomy, and natural menopause in Puebla, Mexico31
2.1.Neurotransmitters and GnRH release33
2.2.Levels of LH, FSH, total estrogens, and progesterone across the menstrual cycle34
2.3.A model of the production of estradiol within ovarian follicles36
2.4.Changes in FSH, LH, estradiol, and estrone levels among women followed longitudinally through the menopausal transition39
2.5.Recalled ages at natural menopause, Puebla, Mexico40
2.6.Nineteenth-century example of uterine displacement42
3.1.Variability of menstrual cycle length52
3.2.Probit analysis to compute median age at menopause in Puebla, Mexico54
3.3.BMI among women of menopausal age, Puebla, Mexico66
4.1.Recalled ages at natural menopause, Asunción, Paraguay91
4.2.Kaplan-Meier analysis to compute median age at menopause in Puebla, Mexico99
5.1.Mood swings, irritability, or weepiness in relation to menopausal status121
6.1.Body diagram131
6.2.Biocultural model for the study of hot flashes141
6.3.The thermoneutral zone144
6.4.Variation in hot flash frequency in relation to temperature of the coldest month146

-ix-

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Menopause: A Biocultural Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Tables xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - The Biological Basis of Menopause 32
  • Chapter Three - Methods of Study 49
  • Chapter Four - Age at Menopause 82
  • Chapter Five - The Discomforts of Menopause 111
  • Chapter Six - Hot Flashes 127
  • Chapter Seven - Conclusions and Future Directions 162
  • Notes 171
  • References 177
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 221
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