The Politics of Judicial Interpretation: The Federal Courts, Department of Justice, and Civil Rights, 1866-1876

By Robert J. Kaczorowski | Go to book overview

4 The Department of Justice
and Civil Rights
Enforcement, 1870–1871

Congress created the Department of Justice approximately one month after the enactment of the Enforcement Act of May 31, 1870. This administrative reform enlarged the attorney general's office and centralized the legal business of the national government within it. By creating a permanent staff of attorneys, Congress expected the new executive department to handle the nation's legal affairs more efficiently and effectively and to eliminate the need to hire outside counsel. These changes reportedly represented a savings of $1,000,000 per year. A massive problem of criminal law enforcement in certain Southern states soon confronted the enlarged and reorganized attorney general's office. The largest and most consuming area that engaged the new department was the protection of civil rights. Overcoming the almost insurmountable obstacles described in the previous chapter, federal legal officers successfully enforced the civil rights acts of 1870 and 1871 against Ku Klux Klan terrorism. Despite their success, or perhaps because of it, the attorney general largely abandoned civil rights enforcement in 1873 in an effort to reduce mounting departmental expenses. The history of the Justice Department's response to the challenge presented by the Ku Klux Klan has not been fully explored. Yet, the extent to which department officers and federal judges attempted to enforce civil rights reveals much about the commitment of federal legal officers to civil rights enforcement during Reconstruction.1

The Department of Justice was inaugurated with a new attorney general. President Grant's first attorney general, E. Rockwood Hoar, resigned his office just days before Congress passed the bill creating the department. In addition to the respect he enjoyed for his legal abilities, Hoar was noted for his integrity and nonpartisanship in conducting the legal affairs of the government. His successor, Amos T. Akerman, also was esteemed for his legal abilities, but he was more controversial. Born in New Hampshire and educated at Dartmouth College, Akerman moved to Georgia where he studied law under John McPherson Berrian, a former United States senator and attorney general under President Andrew Jackson. Akerman strongly opposed secession at the outbreak of the

-62-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Politics of Judicial Interpretation: The Federal Courts, Department of Justice, and Civil Rights, 1866-1876
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.