12
Double Take:
Acting and Writing in Genet’s “The
Strange Word ‘Urb’ “

Acting

In fact, some authorities maintain that that is why plays are called
dramas, because the imitation is of men acting [drōntas, from drān, “do,
act”). It is also the reason why both tragedy and comedy are claimed
by the Dorians: comedy by the Megarians…. They use the names
comedy and drama as evidence; for they say that they call their outlying
villages kōmai whereas the Athenians call theirs demes [demoi]—the
assumption being that the participants in comedy were called kōmōidoi,
not from their being revelers, but because they wandered from one
village to another, being degraded and excluded from the city—and
that they call “doing” or “acting” dārn whereas the Athenians
designate it prattein.1

WHAT HAS traditionally been called “theater” seems to be in a curious situation today. On the one hand, the emergence of electronically powered techniques of articulation and of transmission appears increasingly to marginalize theater. Insofar as it is considered to be a medium of representation, theater is at an increasing disadvantage with regard to the electronic media. Anything it can represent, film and television can show better, more vividly, more extensively, it would seem. On the other hand, despite such competing media and despite large-scale reductions in government subsidies, theater in its traditional institutional forms persists and in certain areas even flourishes, at least in terms of its ability to attract audiences. Music theater, for instance, whether “musical comedy” or “opera,” continues to enjoy considerable popularity, often teaming up with the media to reach audiences that would otherwise remain inaccessible.

The situation is complicated by the very different situations that

-295-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Theatricality as Medium
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 408

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.