Ancient Letters and the New Testament: A Guide to Context and Exegesis

By Hans-Josef Klauck; Daniel P. Bailey | Go to book overview

4
Poetry and Philosophy—Literary Letters

A. Overview of Sources

In the wake of Adolf Deissmann’s trailblazing works, New Testament exegesis became duly impressed with the wealth of original non-literary letters preserved mostly on papyrus and applied itself to comparative work with these letters, admittedly with considerable success. However, research into the comparative use of literary letters fell somewhat behind as a result.1 Yet these letters also offer an abundance of textual material, which on closer inspection divides into very different categories and exhibits numerous points of contact with the New Testament letters. The following presentation therefore begins with a selective inventory of the available materials which, while not aiming at completeness, nevertheless provides an initial orientation to a very broad field.

For convenience, authors are divided into Greek and Latin language groups and are ordered alphabetically, with dates given as well. Texts and translations are presented in the order of the most accessible first, particularly the diglot editions of the Loeb Classical Library and other English translations where available, followed by the French or German diglots such as the Budé or Tusculum-Bücherei (with the occasional Italian edition), then by the most recent critical text and, where different, by the often older edition that underlies the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) electronic text in the case of Greek works. Selected modern studies, where mentioned, are confined to the most essential, as are the

1 On this point one has to agree with K. Berger, “Hellenistische Gattungen” (Bib. 7) 1326–27, 1337–39.

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Ancient Letters and the New Testament: A Guide to Context and Exegesis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • General Bibliographies xix
  • List of Bibliographies xxix
  • List of Exercises xxxiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Foundations—Two Letters of Apion and Two Letters of the [Elder] 9
  • 2 - Practical Realities— Paper and Postal Systems 43
  • 3 - Nonliterary and Diplomatic Correspondence 67
  • 4 - Poetry and Philosophy—Literary Letters 103
  • 5 - Epistolary and Rhetorical Theory 183
  • 6 - Letters in Early Judaism 229
  • 7 - New Testament Letters I: Overview 299
  • 8 - New Testament Letters Ii: Selected Texts 355
  • Epilogue 435
  • Answer Key 445
  • Index of Ancient Sources 471
  • Index of Authors 481
  • Index of Subjects 495
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