Ancient Letters and the New Testament: A Guide to Context and Exegesis

By Hans-Josef Klauck; Daniel P. Bailey | Go to book overview

Answer Key

Exercise 1

Words for letters in English and German. It is not immediately obvious from the German word for a letter, Brief, that such a document should also be “brief” in the English sense (or kurz in the German), but in fact both words go back to the Latin brevis (libellus), “a brief (writing).” There are many ways of filling out the phrases “letter of ____” or “____ letter.” While some English letter types can only be designated by the latter format, e.g. “cover letter,” others are more often attested in the former word order, hence “letter of agreement” and “letter of inquiry” are more common than “agreement letter” and “inquiry letter.” Other common expressions for letter types include the acceptance letter, apology letter, application letter, business letter, complaint letter, congratulation letter, friendly letter, invitation letter, love letter, newsletter, prayer letter, recommendation letter, and rejection letter.


Exercise 2

The fate of letter writing today. According to H. Belke, Literarische Gebrauchsformen, 156 n. 21 (with reference to G. Jappe, “Vom Briefwechsel zum Schriftwechsel,” Merkur 23 [1969] 351–62), the perfecting of the postal service has contributed to the decline of the letter, because during previous times of less frequent postal delivery, people knew how use this precious medium with greater care. Belke adds that the letter remained “a highly respected literary form governed by rhetorical and stylistic norms and rules well into the eighteenth century. Letter writing was considered an art, like poetry and oratory.… The increasing subjectivity of literary expression associated with the general retreat of normative poetics, especially in the romantic period, was naturally destined to have a great effect on the letter as the most personal form of communication.” Finally the many new possibilities for communication also played their role in the decline of the letter. The quotation in Exercise 2

-445-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ancient Letters and the New Testament: A Guide to Context and Exegesis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • General Bibliographies xix
  • List of Bibliographies xxix
  • List of Exercises xxxiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Foundations—Two Letters of Apion and Two Letters of the [Elder] 9
  • 2 - Practical Realities— Paper and Postal Systems 43
  • 3 - Nonliterary and Diplomatic Correspondence 67
  • 4 - Poetry and Philosophy—Literary Letters 103
  • 5 - Epistolary and Rhetorical Theory 183
  • 6 - Letters in Early Judaism 229
  • 7 - New Testament Letters I: Overview 299
  • 8 - New Testament Letters Ii: Selected Texts 355
  • Epilogue 435
  • Answer Key 445
  • Index of Ancient Sources 471
  • Index of Authors 481
  • Index of Subjects 495
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 504

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.