Skills of Clinical Supervision for Nurses: A Practical Guide for Supervisees, Clinical Supervisors, and Managers

By Meg Bond; Stevie Holland | Go to book overview

Series editors’ preface

We welcome this book, the second in the series Supervison in Context, which looks at the particular supervision needs and issues in the various helping professions. The authors, Meg Bond and Stevie Holland, provide a timely contribution to the recent but growing literature on clinical supervison in nursing at a time when the rhetoric of clinical supervision is well ahead of the reality of practice in most organisations. To close the rift between the rhetoric and the reality requires much more emphasis on the understanding and training of effective nurse clinical supervisors, and this is the core focus of this book.

The first book in this series, The Social Work Supervisor, by Allan Brown and lain Bourne, explored the many complex issues of supervising in the different settings where social work operates such as residential care, field social work, probation, hospitals and community development. Social work was the first of the helping professions to develop a strong culture of clinical supervision, not just for those who were in training but throughout the clinical career of the practitioner. Even in social work this culture has developed only over the last 20 years and is still far from established. In nursing the development of clinical supervision has started even more recently and the struggle to establish it as an essential aspect of clinical practice is far from complete. The authors welcome the policy initiatives on clinical supervision that have emanated from the UKCC and other bodies, while showing that practice lags behind. They argue that the need for effective clinical supervision is, in fact, becoming ever more urgent for the practitioner, the patient and the health of health organisations who are under ever-increasing pressures and demands. As they say in their Introduction:

Clinical supervision provides a route to developing and maintaining
emotionally healthier individuals in an emotionally healthier work-force
culture.… Effective systems of clinical supervision can bring benefits
not only to practitioners but also to the organisation and its clients.

-xii-

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