Skills of Clinical Supervision for Nurses: A Practical Guide for Supervisees, Clinical Supervisors, and Managers

By Meg Bond; Stevie Holland | Go to book overview

2
The hidden picture:
resistance to clinical
supervision and
implications for the
clinical supervision
relationship

Although the momentum towards implementing clinical supervision has been growing in recent years there is also concern about why it has taken so long to become accepted in nursing and how it can really take root and grow in a culture that can be so resistant to major change, particularly change which is dependent upon encouraging closer professional relationships. Undoubtedly there is sufficient political will to support it in principle but it remains to be seen how extensively and effectively it will become an organic part of nursing life and be truly instrumental in helping support and develop clinical practice.

Maybe during your reading of the first chapter you also felt your cynicism rising as the old mantras reappeared. Don’t we know enough already, you might think, about the need for accountability, for working in partnership, for improving standards of care? We are all trying to survive great organisational change and have been for some time. Prevention of burn-out through developing self-awareness has been acknowledged for more than 20 years so why are we still going on about it? The repeat button seems to be stuck. And yet we are all destined to keep on repeating ourselves, both individually and collectively as a profession, until what is being aimed for is felt to be understood, accessible and attainable.

This cannot happen until the powerful processes which inhibit us from understanding and reaching our perceived wants and goals are also acknowledged, accepted and understood. In so doing we can divest them of their power to sabotage the process and identify more realistic ways of being effective. We have to bring the unacknowledged and therefore unknown unconscious processes between ourselves and others, be they clients or other colleagues, into our awareness; we need to bring them to the surface where

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