Skills of Clinical Supervision for Nurses: A Practical Guide for Supervisees, Clinical Supervisors, and Managers

By Meg Bond; Stevie Holland | Go to book overview

4
Reflective skills of the
supervisee

This chapter aims to provide some practical frameworks to help you with the reflective process of clinical supervision, with the long term aim of enabling you to integrate this process into your everyday practice. It highlights the need for balance between analytical thinking skills and those of emotional understanding and expression. Both these areas of skills are needed to foster creative reflective practice. Clinical supervision can provide a space to try out these skills and in so doing allow the supervisee, with the help of the clinical supervisor or members of a clinical supervision group, to identify the skills they already have proficiency in and those that are less easily available to them.

How you as supervisee use clinical supervision time to think about, select from, describe, be critical about, disclose and so on, will also in part reflect the skills you have honed and developed in your personal life. Earlier attachment and educational histories may affect the range of thinking and emotional skills immediately at your disposal. The frameworks offered in this chapter must be seen in the context of the clinical supervision relationship: time must be allowed for enough feelings of trust and self-confidence to develop before the frameworks can be used effectively as part of the working alliance. Not all of the this chapter will be relevant to every reader, but some of the guidelines may enable you to identify some of the gaps in your skills and reflect on them with reference to the blocks and attachment implications explored in Chapter 2.

In this chapter we also wish to distinguish between reflection on practice and reflection in practice. This distinction relates to Fish et al.’s (1989) terms ‘learning from practice’ and Teaming through practice’. Learning from practice suggests that there is an ideal way to practice, sanctioned by theory and the ‘way it is done around here’. Learning through practice suggests more of a dynamic process ‘through which to learn something wider and of more significance’ (Fish et al. 1989: 32). This more sophisticated absorption and integration of a range of skills allows for on-the-spot processing, reflection,

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