Skills of Clinical Supervision for Nurses: A Practical Guide for Supervisees, Clinical Supervisors, and Managers

By Meg Bond; Stevie Holland | Go to book overview

6
Informative and
challenging skills of
the clinical supervisor

Most of the help that you as clinical supervisor give to the supervisee is in the form of support and catalytic facilitation of the supervisee’s own reflection on issues affecting practice. You will usually need to be very sparing in giving information, advice or challenging, but this authoritative dimension of the role of the clinical supervisor or supervision group member is an essential element of the process. In Chapter 2 we asked you to think about the use of power within the clinical supervision relationship, and suggested that there was a great deal of confusion and ambivalence about its use in all professional relationships, both with clients and colleagues. On the one hand, nurses can often have a tendency to give too much information and advice: this is shown in numerous communication studies in nursing (see the literature review in Kendall 1991). On the other, there is a tendency to avoid using challenging, illustrated by Burnard and Morrison’s study (1988). Although the clinical supervisor’s repertoire of non-directive skills is crucial for encouraging a working alliance, centring on professional growth and support, clinical supervisors need to balance this with more directive approaches. We find that once nurses learn the effectiveness of support and catalytic skills, they can sometimes become excessively non-directive, withholding information, advice or challenge inappropriately as far as the clinical supervision relationship is concerned. In Chapter 2 we suggested that some practitioners shy away from or minimise the authoritative dimension of their role and can be quick to feel anxious or resistant to perceived authority themselves and in others. In this chapter you are urged to remember the distinction we drew in Chapter 2 between authoritative and authoritarian, when we suggested that authoritative skills were based on valid experience, knowledge and skills, which can be used non-abusively to enable and support others.

This chapter will focus on the skills necessary to achieve an appropriately authoritative approach. This is consistent with the concern nurses have about professional accountability and standards and with the support and growth

-152-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Skills of Clinical Supervision for Nurses: A Practical Guide for Supervisees, Clinical Supervisors, and Managers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 240

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.