Ordinary Lifestyles: Popular Media, Consumption and Taste

By David Bell; Joanne Hollows | Go to book overview

12 It's a girl thing
Teenage magazines, lifestyle and
consumer culture

Fan Carter

Launched in November 1994, the British teenage girls' magazine Sugar offered its readers a new twist on the staple format of fashion, beauty, pop and advice. A monthly publication produced on good quality paper in a perfect-bound edition, Sugar claimed it was offering its discerning readers ‘something new’ (Sugar, November 1994: 4). Beyond these immediate signifiers towards the grown-up world of the ‘glossies’, the launch and subsequent success of the magazine signalled a set of deeper shifts in the period which saw the increasing significance of lifestyle strategies in the organization and management of the teen magazine market.

Justified with the authoritative claim that the industry was giving teenagers what they wanted, the marketing puffs of teenage magazines declaimed the status of ‘style bible’ (J-17 1997) and ‘best friend[s]’ (Sugar 1997) for the teenage girl reader. As such, these magazines operated in terms of producing and legitimizing particular forms of knowledge about being a teenage girl and offering specific tutoring in appropriate feminine practices. Indeed, teenage magazines have long been considered to act as guides or instruction manuals in the operations of femininity and have been examined as such in feminist media and cultural research (Alderson 1968; McRobbie 1982, 1991, 1996; Tinkler 1995; Currie 1997).

In some ways the developments in the teenage magazine industry during the 1990s can be seen as an intensification of the processes that Angela McRobbie (1991) has termed the ‘logics of consumption’. Increasingly editorial and promotional features have tied the making of adolescent feminine selves to the acquisition and deployment of appropriate products and celebrated shopping and consumption as specifically feminine pleasures. However, the changes in the 1990s were also shaped by the increasing circulation of lifestyle discourses both in the magazine editorials and also, significantly, in the industry's own narratives. Woven into these accounts of market development and expansion are particular images and imaginings of the teenage girl. Central to these formulations is the notion that adolescence constitutes a significant moment of identity formation, as both a teenage girl and a

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ordinary Lifestyles: Popular Media, Consumption and Taste
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 284

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.