Marguerite Duras: Fascinating Vision and Narrative Cure

By Deborah N. Glassman | Go to book overview

2
Fascinating Vision and Narrative Cure :
The Ravishing of Lol V. Stein

The Indian Cycle opens with Le Ravissement de Lol V. Stein, a pivotal novel which Duras published in 1964.1 Not only does Le Ravissement de Lol V. Stein inaugurate this unique constellation of works, but it serves as its prehistory as well. Virtually all of the subsequent Indian Cycle novels and films allude to Lol's adventure of passion and trauma. The ball at which Lol silently watches as her fiancé is enraptured, in the space of a dance, by another woman, is the mesmerizingly absent center of the Indian Cycle texts. The ball occurred ten years before the opening of Le Ravissement, and is mythologized in the subsequent texts whose chronologies, if ambiguous, always set the ball outside their narrative frames. In the penultimate film of the group, India Song, for example, the two feminine voices that we hear at the beginning, elliptically summarize Lol's story, which becomes a model for their own absorbing passion, just as it models many of the passions of these plots.

voix 1 : Michael Richardson était fiancé à une jeune fille de S. Tahla, Lola

Valérie Stein…

voix 2: Le mariage devait avoir lieu à l'automne. Puis il y a eu ce bal…
ce bal de S. Tahla.

voix 1 : Elle était arrivée tard à ce bal… au milieu de la nuit… habillée
de noir

voix 2 : Que d'amour ce bal, que de désir.

voice 1 : Michael Richardson was engaged to a young girl in S. Tahla, Lola
Valérie Stein.

voice 2: The marriage was to take place in the fall. Then there was this
dance, this dance in S. Tahla.

voice 1 : She had arrived late at the dance … in the middle of the night
… dressed in black.

voice 2: So much love, so much desire, this ball at S. Tahla.

During a conversation between Duras and Xavière Gauthier about

-34-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Marguerite Duras: Fascinating Vision and Narrative Cure
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • 1 - Presenting Marguerite Duras 9
  • 2 - Fascinating Vision and Narrative Cure : the Ravishing of Lol V. Stein 34
  • 3 - Le Vice-Consul and India Song: Dolores Mundi 62
  • 4 - Autographies and Fictions 93
  • Notes 122
  • Bibliography 142
  • Index 149
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 152

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.