Marguerite Duras: Fascinating Vision and Narrative Cure

By Deborah N. Glassman | Go to book overview

4
Autographies and Fictions

“[J]e me demande si les autres femmes de mes livres ne l'ont pas masquée
longtemps, si derrière Lol V. Stein il n'y avait pas Anne-Marie Stretter,
parce qu'il n'y a pas de raison. Cette fascination dure toujours, je ne m'en
sors pas, c'est une véritable histoire d'amour…. Quelquefois je me dis
que j'ai écrit à cause d'elle.”1

“D'où vient la fascination qu'elle exerce? C'est à vous autres de le dire,
je ne sais pas.”2

(I wonder if the other women in my books have not hidden her for a
long time, if Anne-Marie Stretter was not behind Lol. V. Stein, because
there is no reason that this fascination should still exist, I cannot free
myself from it, it's a veritable love story…. Sometimes I say to myself
that I wrote because of her.

From where does the fascination which she exercises come? It is up to
you others to say, I do not know.)

Or, qu'est-ce que la fascination, si ce n'est pour ainsi dire la forme
tempérée ou clémente du sentiment d'étrangeté ou d'incroyable familiarité
(Unheimlkhkeit) qui surgit quand il y a en face de moi (ou dans ce qu'il y
a en face de moi dans le Gegenstand) quelque chose d'ignoré mais qui est
cependant la racine de mon identité, qui m'est à moi-même étrangère?3

(But what is fascination, if not the tempered or clement form of a feeling
of strangeness or of incredible familiarity [unheimlichkeit] which surges
forth when there is, before me [or in the object before me, gegenstand]
something which is unknown yet at the root of my identity and which
remains foreign to me.)


THE MEMORY, THE FANTASY

Anne-Marie Stretter4 is both a key to the Indian Cycle and to Duras's familial and social universes, in which her oeuvre is anchored.5 Throughout the Indian Cycle and in many interviews

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Marguerite Duras: Fascinating Vision and Narrative Cure
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • 1 - Presenting Marguerite Duras 9
  • 2 - Fascinating Vision and Narrative Cure : the Ravishing of Lol V. Stein 34
  • 3 - Le Vice-Consul and India Song: Dolores Mundi 62
  • 4 - Autographies and Fictions 93
  • Notes 122
  • Bibliography 142
  • Index 149
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 152

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.