Marguerite Duras: Fascinating Vision and Narrative Cure

By Deborah N. Glassman | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1. Presenting Marguerite Duras

1. Duras claims that her political affiliations prevented the committee from giving her the prize in 1948, when Un Barrage contre le Pacifique was among the finalists. She was a Communist at the time. “Apostrophes,” 28 September 1984, Antenne 2 (French television station).

2. Marcelle Marini pertinently points out that many of the critics, whose published remarks figured in the press packet of articles that Editions de Minuit assembled and put out to accompany L'Amant, stressed the confessional aspect and not the literary aspect of this work. Her argument is part of a longer polemic in which she is engaged regarding Duras's critical reception in general. See Marini, “Une Femme sans aveu,” p. 6 and footnote 4.

3. For a bibliography/filmography of works through 1980, see Lyon, “Marguerite Duras.” Camera Obscura 6 (Fall 1980), 50–55. For a filmography/bibliography current through 1983, see Entretiens de Marguerite Duras avec Dominique Noguez, in the publication accompanying the vidéocassette collection, Oeuvres cinématographiques edition vidéographique critique (Paris: Maison des Relations Extérieures, 1983).

4. “The postwar reputation of the American novel prompted many a writer, including Marguerite Duras, to attempt a type of fiction that betrays … the influence of Hemingway” (Cismaru, Marguerite Duras, [New York: Twayne, 1971] p. 17). “Marguerite Duras began, then, by drawing in some measure her inspiration from the American novel. … It is well perhaps to insist somewhat on that Barrage (1950) [sic] which placed Madame Duras in the front ranks of the young French novelists” (Armand Hoog, “Itinerary of Marguerite Duras,” Yale French Studies 25. For further elucidation about the relationship between Hemingway and Duras, see Steinmetz-Schunemann, Die bedeutung der zeit in den romanen von Marguerite Duras.

5. The early debates were never well-resolved, according to Ouellet.

L'expression “Nouveau Roman” n'est ni heureuse ni originale pour désigner un ensemble
d'oeuvres qui présentent indéniablement certaines analogies entre elles, mais n'en sont pas
moins le plus souvent fort éloignées les unes des autres…. Presque tous les critiques des
années 1955 ont rivalisé d'imagination pour coiffer d'un titre original cette nouvelle forme
romanesque: Ecole du Regard, Chapelle de Minuit, Romans de la Table Rase, Romans
blancs, Anti-ou Ante-Romans…. Mais seule l'expression ‘Nouveau Roman’ est demeurée
et l'on ne voit pas qu'elle disparaisse bientôt (Critiques de notre temps, [Paris: Gamier, 1972]
p. 7).

(“New Novel' is neither a felicitous nor an original formulation by which to designate a
group of works which, undeniably, display certain analogies between them but are no less,
more often than not, very different from one another. Almost all of the critics in 1955
competed to find an original designation for this new novelistic form: The School of the Eye,

-122-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Marguerite Duras: Fascinating Vision and Narrative Cure
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • 1 - Presenting Marguerite Duras 9
  • 2 - Fascinating Vision and Narrative Cure : the Ravishing of Lol V. Stein 34
  • 3 - Le Vice-Consul and India Song: Dolores Mundi 62
  • 4 - Autographies and Fictions 93
  • Notes 122
  • Bibliography 142
  • Index 149
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 152

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.