The Teachings of Modern Christianity on Law, Politics, and Human Nature - Vol. 1

By John Witte Jr.; Frank S. Alexander | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

THIS VOLUME AND its companion are products of a three-year project of the Law and Religion Program at Emory University. Our project is part of a broader effort of The Pew Charitable Trusts and the University of Notre Dame to stimulate and support new scholarship on the place of Christianity in various fields of academic specialty. Armed with a major grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts, Notre Dame Provost Nathan O. Hatch and his colleagues have assembled ten groups of scholars in such fields as law, philosophy, literature, and economics, who have an interest in the scholarly place of Christianity in their particular discipline. Each of these ten groups of specialists has been asked to address the general theme of “Christianity and the Nature of the Person” from the perspective of its particular discipline. Each group has been asked to produce a major new study that speaks to this theme in a manner that is edifying both to scholars in other fields and to peers of all faiths in its own field.

We have been privileged to lead the team on law. We wish to thank the immensely talented group of contributors to this volume, with whom we have deliberated our project mandate and divided the work. From among this group, we give special thanks to Kent Greenawalt for his sage advice on the structure of these volumes; Russell Hittinger, Patrick Brennan, and Angela Carmella for helping us shape the Catholic materials; Milner Ball, Timothy Jackson, and Nicholas Wolterstorff for helping us shape the Protestant materials, and Mark Noll for writing the section introduction after the fact; and Vigen Guroian, Paul Valliere, and Mikhail Kulakov for helping us shape the Orthodox materials. We also wish to thank other scholars who offered us advice and criticism at the early stages of this project: James Billington, Librarian of Congress; Wolfgang Huber, Bishop of BerlinBrandenburg; Judge Michael McConnell; and Kathy Caveny, John Erickson, Jon Gunnemann, Emily Hartigan, Jaroslav Pelikan, Jefferson

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