The Teachings of Modern Christianity on Law, Politics, and Human Nature - Vol. 1

By John Witte Jr.; Frank S. Alexander | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 13
Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906–1945)

MILNER BALL

In an exceptional act in an exceptional time, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, a German Lutheran theologian and pastor, joined the conspiracy against Adolf Hitler. The Nazis imprisoned and then executed him shortly before the end of World War II.

During his final months, he developed a daring theological interpretation of his life that his closest friend and biographer, Eberhard Bethge, describes as “the relinquishment of a special Christian life and as the acceptance … of an incognito existence.” With this theology, he achieved a breakthrough that reveals “the future normality: ‘being for others’ as sharing in the suffering of Jesus.” His life and work lose their exceptional character and become, as Bethge says, “an example of being Christian today.”1

A statue of Bonhoeffer is one of ten in Westminster Abbey honoring Christian martyrs of the twentieth century. But the greater living tribute lies in the challenging influence of his example beyond Europe, in places as far flung as America, Latin America, South Africa, and Korea—especially among the embattled and those led by Christ to make responsible use of power on their behalf.

Such influence has been unexpected. It could scarcely have been foreseen from the experimental, incomplete nature of Bonhoeffer's late theology and the need to piece it together from the tantalizing fragments that survived the war and his imprisonment. Nor could it have been predicted from his prior life. He was one of eight children of a privileged German family. He was an accomplished pianist, an elegant dancer, and a theologian with the promise of a brilliant career in the academy. He appeared to be far removed from the suffering of outcasts and the dark politics of military conspiracy when he entered upon his academic career in Berlin in 1931 just after a first visit to the United States. Two events intervened to change the person and the career: Bonhoeffer became a practicing believer

-381-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Teachings of Modern Christianity on Law, Politics, and Human Nature - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 806

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.