The Teachings of Modern Christianity on Law, Politics, and Human Nature - Vol. 1

By John Witte Jr.; Frank S. Alexander | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 21
Vladimir Nikolaievich Lossky (1903–1958)

MIKHAIL M. KULAKOV

Vladimir Nikolaievich Lossky was born in 1903 in St. Petersburg into the family of a well-known Russian intuitionist philosopher, Nikolay Onufriyevich Lossky. He studied briefly at the universities of Petrograd and Prague before matriculating at the University of Paris, from which he eventually graduated with a degree in medieval studies in 1927. In 1922 Vladimir was exiled from Russia with his father's family and other notable intellectuals who had refused to cooperate with the new Soviet government. After a two-year stay in Prague, the family settled in Paris, where Lossky immersed himself in study of Western theology and spirituality under the guidance of the influential Thomist scholar Etienne Gilson.

Lossky devoted a great deal of time to the study of Meister Eckhart's negative mysticism. He detected a certain affinity between this German Dominican friar and the Byzantine mystics. Eckhart rejected the earlier attempts of Western medieval mystics to encounter God with prayer, using one's rational abilities. He was convinced that it is easier to say what God is not than to attempt to formulate what God is. To seek a direct and immediate fellowship of the soul with the inexpressible and unapproachable God was, for Eckhart, a much more fruitful endeavor. Yet, Lossky did not find Eckhart (particularly Eckhart's Gottheit) to be sufficiently personalist in his negative (or apophatic, from the Greek apophasis, “denial”) approach. Nor was Eckhart able to overcome the tendency of considering “common nature” before the persons of the Trinity. Lossky's brilliant study Theologie négative et connaissance de Dieu chez Maitre Eckhart was published in Paris posthumously in 1960. The study of the Western scholastic and mystical traditions led Lossky to a thorough investigation of the roots of spiritual and doctrinal divergence between East and West and a search for points of contact and unity.

-612-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Teachings of Modern Christianity on Law, Politics, and Human Nature - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 806

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.