The Teachings of Modern Christianity on Law, Politics, and Human Nature - Vol. 1

By John Witte Jr.; Frank S. Alexander | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 22
Mother Maria Skobtsova (1891–1945)

MICHAEL PLEKON

The way to God lies through the love of people. At the Last Judgment I shall
not be asked whether I was successful in my ascetic exercises, not how many
bows and prostrations I made. Instead I shall be asked, Did I feed the hungry,
clothe the naked, visit the sick and the prisoners. That is all I shall be asked.
About every poor, hungry and imprisoned person the Savior says “I”: “I was
hungry and thirsty, I was sick and in prison” To think that he puts an equal
sign between himself and anyone in need. …I always knew it, but now it has
somehow penetrated to my sinews. It fills me with awe
.

—MOTHER MARIA SKOBTSOVA

The nun, radical social activist, and martyr we know as Mother Maria Skobtsova (1891–1945) had many names, roles, and identities in her life.1 The diverse sides of her personality, the many gifts with which she was endowed, and the various ways in which she exerted her spiritual, artistic, and philanthropic energies are at first overwhelming. It is as if she could not live just one life. She was an artist but also a political activist. She distanced herself from the faith into which she had been baptized, yet later, Christ, the gospel, and the direct care of suffering people defined her existence.

Born Elisaveta Iurevna Pilenko in Riga, Latvia, she grew up in her family's homes in St. Petersburg and in Anapa, by the Black Sea in the south of Russia. Her birth was difficult, requiring a Caesarian section. All her biographers cite her mother Sophie Pilenko's observation that during her life, Liza, as her family called her, became well acquainted with death. At her baptism, she almost suffocated during the triple immersion. Her father Iouri died suddenly in 1906, propelling her already weakened faith into a crisis. How could a good God permit such a good man to die when his family so needed him? She would bury two of her three children before her

-649-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Teachings of Modern Christianity on Law, Politics, and Human Nature - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 806

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.