From Fetish to Subject: Race, Modernism, and Primitivism, 1919-1935

By Carole Sweeney | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I owe many people thanks for their encouragement and support during the process of this book. Firstly, thanks to my editor at Greenwood, Marcia Goldstein, and my project coordinator at Impressions, Brenda Scott, both of whom were always transatlantically efficient and approachable. Thanks to friends and colleagues at the University of Southampton who have ensured a lively intellectual and social context for this work, in particular Nicky Marsh, Carrie Hamilton, Vivienne Orchard, Florence Myles and Jackie Clarke. Thanks also go to Maria Lauret who has seen and aided the transformation of this project over the years. Lastly very special thanks to Pascale and Doug whose love, humour and conversation have sustained me.

I am grateful to the Modern Languages at the University of Southampton for granting me study leave to complete work on the book. And to Cornelia for making it possible to go to the Schomburg Centre in Harlem to complete archival research during that leave.

I would also like to thank the British Academy for a grant to complete research for this book in the Schomburg Center for Black Culture in Harlem.

Some material in this book has appeared elsewhere in substantially revised form. They are:

Nottingham French Studies. “Resisting the Primitive: The Nardal Sisters, La Revue du Monde Noire and La Dépêche Africaine” Vol. 43, No. 2, Summer, 2004.

Journal of Romance Studies. ‘“I’ll say it’s getting darker and darker in Paris all the time’ négrophilie and Inter-war France” Vol. 1 No. 2, Autumn 2001.

-xi-

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