The Just Meritocracy: IQ, Class Mobility, and American Social Policy

By Paul Kamolnick | Go to book overview

Chapter Three
The Meritocratic Ideal and American
Social Policy

The fact that. . . sociological assumptions are politically correct does not make the
sociological conclusions that flow from them scientifically correct
.

—Udry (1994)

There is no escape from the conclusion that nature prevails enormously over nurture
when the differences of nurture do not exceed what is commonly to be found among
persons of the same rank in the same country
.

—Galton (1883)

The social science that deals in public policy has in the latter part of the twentieth
century become self-censored and riddled with taboos
in a word, corrupt. Only the
most profound, anguished, and divisive reexamination is going to change this situ-
ation, and it has to be done within the profession
.

—Murray (1996)

For whatever reasons, then, we today have mostly grown up in an intellectual cli-
mate dominated by extreme, unrestrained environmentalism, which is the modern
alternative to Darwinism. . . . Virtually all influential political and social theories
since the 1930s assume that society, as well as the individuals composing it, are
shaped mainly by social forces. Change those forces, the theorists promise, and man
in society will change accordingly. ...Asa psychologist submerged for twenty years
in the depths of environmentalistic behaviorism, I was slow to identify the current
that guided my work, especially since almost everyone around me was caught in the
same stream
.

Herrnstein (1973)

I PROPOSE IN THIS CHAPTER an interpretation of the policy implications arising from the fact that individual mental ability, itself significantly heritable, is a major proximate cause of individual-level differences in meritocratic-mediated socioeconomic status. First, I provide an explicit definition of the concept “meritocracy” and a brief conceptual clarifica-

-86-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Just Meritocracy: IQ, Class Mobility, and American Social Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Chapter One - Individual Variation in General Mental Ability 1
  • Chapter Two - Human Mental Ability and Socioeconomic Status: the [G-Nexus] 41
  • Chapter Three - The Meritocratic Ideal and American Social Policy 86
  • Conclusion 126
  • Bibliography 128
  • Index 141
  • About the Author 148
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 148

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.