Principle over Politics? The Domestic Policy of the George H. W. Bush Presidency

By Richard Himelfarb; Rosanna Perotti | Go to book overview

10
Major Initiatives of the Department
of Health and Human Services
during the Bush Years

Louis W. Sullivan

I am convinced that President Bush will be remembered favorably by historians and the American public for his many initiatives in this area. One measure of his success in our issues is the inclusion in this conference of a review of the Department of Health and Human Services. President Bush made health care reform a compelling goal of his administration, recognizing HHS as a first-tier cabinet-level agency and propelling health care issues to the front pages of our nation’s newspapers and periodicals. Under President Bush, the American public began a spirited debate, a complex debate, on health reform, a debate that continues to the present.

A measure of his success was the ability of the president to draw the best and brightest minds into his administration. The moderator of this panel, Dr. Antonia Novello, was the first Hispanic-American and first female surgeon general of the United States. In her role, she set a high standard. I remember her confirmation hearing, where she promised—and she delivered—an apolitical candor. Quoting Cervantes, she said she would never “mince the matter.” This morning she’s given us a taste of her acerbic tongue.

She worked tirelessly for the American people. Others on our panel I remember fondly working with. Ed Derwinski was an outstanding member of the cabinet, serving as the first secretary of the Veterans Administration. And Bill Roper, who was already part of the Reagan administration, continued during the Bush years as a deputy assistant in the White House and as director of the Centers for Disease Control, where his service was outstanding in all of those roles.

There were five major objectives of the department during my tenure at HHS. First was to increase health promotion and disease prevention efforts in our nation.

-243-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Principle over Politics? The Domestic Policy of the George H. W. Bush Presidency
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.