Teenagers and Community Service: A Guide to the Issues

By Maureen E. Kenny; Laura A. Gallagher | Go to book overview

Series Foreword

Contemporary Youth Issues is a series of volumes that provides new and important educational materials for the youth and adults involved in middle schools, high schools, and public libraries. Volumes in the series offer accessible information about the nature of the issues facing contemporary youth (children in the first two decades of life), parents, and youth-serving professionals—for example, teachers, practitioners, and governmental and nongovernmental organization personnel.

Both the challenges to healthy development confronting contemporary youth and the assets or strengths of adolescents and of the communities that contribute to their positive development are represented. Each book in the series reviews current knowledge about these challenges and assets, directs youth and adults to current community resources available to address challenges or enhance assets, and discusses key issues of policy and program design pertinent to improving the lives of the diverse youth of the United States and the world.


THE CONCEPT OF THE SERIES

Childhood and adolescence are developmental periods during which most of a person s biological, cognitive, psychological, and social characteristics are changing from what is present at birth to what is considered adultlike. For children and adolescents, and for the parents, friends, and teachers who support and nurture them, the first two decades of life are

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teenagers and Community Service: A Guide to the Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1 - Overview 1
  • 2 - Chronology 71
  • 3 - Biographical Sketches 89
  • 4 - Facts and Data 121
  • 5 - Directory of Organizations, Associations, and Government and International Agencies 171
  • 6 - Selected Resources 227
  • Glossary 291
  • Index 293
  • About the Authors 303
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 304

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.