Terrorism and Peacekeeping: New Security Challenges

By Volker C. Franke | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
“A Firm and Commensurate
Response”: U.S. Retaliation for
the Bush Assassination Attempt

ANDREW J. BACEVICH

Late on the night of April 13, 1993, two vehicles, one a Mercedes Benz sedan, the other a Toyota Land Cruiser, their headlights darkened, crossed undetected from Iraq into Kuwait. The two vehicles carried a total of ten passengers, all Iraqi citizens. They also carried a cargo that included illicit whisky, handguns, an AK47 assault rifle, ammunition, and eighty kilograms of explosives built into the frame of the Land Cruiser. Their mission was a deadly serious one: to exact a modicum of revenge for the humiliation that Iraq had suffered two years earlier at the hands of the United States and its coalition partners during the Persian Gulf War. More specifically, their mission was to assassinate former U.S. President George Bush on his forthcoming visit to Kuwait.

Arriving at the outskirts of Kuwait City, the would-be assassins hid the Land Cruiser in an empty warehouse and linked up with four additional collaborators—three Kuwaitis, the fourth an Iraqi resident of Kuwait. They also put the finishing touches on three plans to kill Bush on April 15. The primary plan was to detonate a bomb by remote control as the former president’s motorcade passed by on its way to a public ceremony at Kuwait University. In the event that that plan failed, the principal backup involved positioning the Land Cruiser, packed with explosives and a manual clock-type detonator, on Bush Street near the site of a planned appearance by the former president. If all else failed, Wali al-Gahazali, one of the ringleaders of the group, would as a last resort don a bomb belt and attempt to rush Mr. Bush in a suicide attack.

This daring plot unraveled even before it got fully underway. On April 14, former President Bush arrived in Kuwait. That same day, the conspirators returned to their hiding place after reconnoitering the city to find

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Terrorism and Peacekeeping: New Security Challenges
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.