Twentieth-Century Cause Caelaebre: Sacco, Vanzetti, and the Press, 1920-1927

By John F. Neville | Go to book overview

Notes

PREFACE

1. Harold D. Lasswell, Propaganda Technique in the World War (New York: Peter Smith, 1938), p. 2.

2. Richard S. Lambert, Propaganda (London: Thomas Nelson and Son Ltd., 1938), p. 7.

3. Ibid., p. 7.

4. Daniel J. Czitrom, Media and the American Mind: Prom Morse to McLuhan (Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1982), p. 123.

5. Lasswell, Propaganda Technique, p. 9.

6. Edward L. Bernays, Propaganda (New York: Liverright Publishing Corp., 1928), p. 9.

7. Ibid., p. 20.

8. Lambert, Propaganda, p. 131.

9. Serge Chakotin, The Rape of the Masses: The Psychology of Totalitarian Political Propaganda (New York: Haskell House Publishers, Ltd., 1971), pp. 170–171.

10. Egal Feldman, The Dreyfus Affair and the American Conscience: 1893–1906 (Detroit, Mi.: Wayne State University Press, 1981), pp. 86–88; Betty Schechter, The Dreyfus Affair: A National Scandal (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1965), p. 208.

11. Schechter, Dreyfus Affair, p. 208.

12. Feldman, Dreyfus Affair and American Conscience, p. 89.

13. Warren I. Susman, Culture as History: The Transformation of American Society in the Twentieth Century (New York: Pantheon Books, 1984), p. 8.

14. Richard Hofstadter, “The Paranoid Style in American Politics,” Harper’s, November, 1964, pp. 79–86.

-155-

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Twentieth-Century Cause Caelaebre: Sacco, Vanzetti, and the Press, 1920-1927
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Secrets: the Galleanisti 1
  • 2 - The Trial 27
  • 3 - Appeals and Cocaine 43
  • 4 - Deus Ex Machina: Zola Redux 57
  • 5 - The Long Good-Bye 85
  • 6 - A Cardinal Calamity 109
  • 7 - Pilate on the Boston Train 113
  • Epilogue 141
  • Notes 155
  • Select Bibliography 173
  • Index 179
  • About the Author 191
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