Unplugged: Reclaiming Our Right to Die in America

By William H. Colby | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction

1. William H. Colby, Long Goodbye: The Deaths of Nancy Cruzan (Carlsbad, CA: Hay House, Inc., 2002), 383.

2. William R. Levesque, et al., “Tube is removed after chaotic day,” St. Petersburg Times, March 19, 2005, 1A.

3. Anita Kumar, et al., “One by one, options sink,” St. Petersburg Times, March 18, 2005, 1A; William R. Levesque, et al., “Schiavo: same judges, same result,” St. Petersburg Times, March 26, 2005, 1A.

4. Joanne Lynn, Sick to Death and Not Going to Take It Anymore! (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004), 67–68; Brown University Center for Gerontology and Health Care Research, “Facts on dying,” www.chcr.brown.edu/dying (accessed January 2006).

5. Colby, “5 minutes that can spare a family years of pain,” USA Today, March 6, 2005, 13A.


Chapter 1

1. Diana Lynne, Terri’s Story: The Court-Ordered Death of an American Woman (Nashville: Cumberland House Publishing, Inc., 2005); Mark Fuhrman, Silent Witness: The Untold Story of Terri Schiavo’s Death (New York: Morrow, 2005); Jon B. Eisenberg, Using Terri: The Religious Right’s Conspiracy to Take Away Our Rights (San Francisco: Harper San Francisco, 2005).

2. Michael Schiavo with Michael Hirsh, Terri: The Truth (New York: Dutton, 2006); Mary and Robert Schindler, et al., A Life That Matters: The Legacy of Terri Schiavo—A Lesson For Us All (New York: Warner Books, 2006).

3. Arian Campo-Flores, “The legacy of Terri Schiavo,” Newsweek, April 4, 2005, 24.

-227-

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