Liam Mellows and the Irish Revolution

By C. Desmond Greaves | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWELVE
DIRECTOR OF PURCHASES

“Auferre, trucidare, rapere, falsis nominibus imperium: atque ubi solitud-
inemfaciunt, pacem appellant.”—Tacitus

THE Philadelphia passed the Lizard on 10th October, and tied up at Southampton next day. With a seaman who was rejoining his ship in London, Mellows made his way to Lisson Grove, Marylebone, where Sean Nunan’s parents lived. The father was an old I.R.B. man, and Labour supporter. He and his wife kept open house to members of the Irish movement in London. And there were three sparkling lasses, a few years younger than Mellows, who were excited at their new romantic visitor and delighted at his combination of gravity and playfulness. Mellows needed a few days to recover from the exhausting labour of the voyage. He had never been in London before. He saw the sights, bought clothes and a few souvenirs, and familiarised himself with the situation in Ireland. After about ten days he left for Dublin, probably cutting short his stay in view of an expected rail strike.

On 9th October, Lloyd George had made his notorious speech at Caernarvon in which he flatly rejected Dominion Status for Ireland, the proposal of the Asquith Liberals. He declared vaingloriously, “We have murder by the throat.” A great “Hands off Ireland” meeting filled Trafalgar Square on the 10th. The greater part of the British press was demanding changes in government policy, but reports of fresh atrocities were published every day. Mellows’ old friend Dr. McNabb had been arrested for declining to provide the names of patients whose injuries might have been incurred in disturbances. On 7th October raiders had searched the houses of Dr. Kathleen Lynn, Mrs. SheehySkeffmgton, Mrs. Tom Clarke and Mrs. Coffey hoping to find Darrell Figgis. They found instead H. W. Nevinson who was provided with blistering copy.

In the counties of Donegal, Laois and Waterford the authorities had forbidden the holding of inquests. There were thus some murders which were not to be got by the throat. Despite protests that Britain was applying to Ireland the weapon she had used on Germany, the

-220-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Liam Mellows and the Irish Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 416

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.