The Therapeutic Potential of Creative Writing: Writing Myself

By Gillie Bolton | Go to book overview

Subject Index
abstraction 37–38
acceptance 174
access to inner words 21
addictive nature of writing 23–24
Age Concern 191, 228
Age Exchange 188
Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland 111
aloneness, safety in 21
alteration (person and tense) 43–44
American perspective on scriptotherapy 204
approaches to therapeutic writing
assumed perfection, unhelpfulness of 196
experimentation and exploration 197
guidance, holding the hand which holds the pen 207–212
inventive use of writing
clearing the mind 206
‘couples therapy’ 205
diagnosis and assessing disorders 206
mastering trauma 206
poetry and emotional disturbance 205–206
postal psychotherapeutic relationship 206
scenario writing 205
self-addressed letters 205
shared understanding through therapy 205
mirror or model 196–198
multidimensional nature of creativity 197
multidimensional nature of self 198
playing with possibilities 197
practice and theory, examples 204–206
research, healing power of poetry 201–204
research, post-trauma writing 198–201
self and consciousness of self 196
self as source 210–212
suffering as basis for creativity 198
US perspective on scriptotherapy 204
words and voices 195–196
writing in therapy, examples of good practice 207–210
appropriate intervention 162
art forms other than writing 76
art, skill and therapeutic writing 14
art? 223–226
Arts Council of England 228
Arts for Health 228
Arvon Foundation, The 228
attitude of mind, a starting point 20
authorial address to readers 12
authorial voices, variety (in this book) 12
autobiography
see also fiction; poetry
child, writing as a 109–110
examples of therapeutic writing 107
five senses as stimuli 109
healing narratives 106–107
how to write
autobiographically 107–109
inner child, getting in touch 110
lifelines 108
points to remember when writing 109
positive change, components for 105
power of 185
re-reading and redrafting 109
reconciliatory nature of 105
restoring a disrupted connectedness 105
sense of self, working towards a positive 106
storytelling a primary human mechanism 104–105
availability, constant, of the possibility of writing 23
beginners’ blocks, overcoming 33–34
The Bell Jar 184
Beware of Buttons 53
Beyond Bedlam: Poems Written out of Mental Distress 219
Biographia Literaria 20
body language 74
brainstorming and spidergrams 115–116
breaks and exercise 19
British Medical Journal 161, 201
Bump Starting the Hearse 153
Burnt Norton 61
Buttons 52–53
cancer, writing as a sufferer 176
Carribean Times 181
Castle of Light 167–168
cathartic nature of writing 23, 39–40
character, illumination and imagination 111–112
cleansing nature of therapeutic writing 21
clearing clutter 20
closed groups, effectiveness of 128
Colchester Institute, M.A. in Health and the Arts 229
collaborative stimulation 182
comfort and peace 174–175
commenting, a skill to be learned 86, 131,
communication through writing 26, 175–176

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