French Colonialism Unmasked: The Vichy Years in French West Africa

By Ruth Ginio | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. Bara Diouf, b. 1931, interview, Dakar, 14 Feb. 2001.

2. Jennings, Vichy in the Tropics.

3. Cantier, L’Algérie; Levisse-Touzé, L’Afrique du Nord; Akpo-Vaché, L’AOF. Michel Abitbol discusses North Africa under Vichy in relation to the Jewish population; see Les juifs.

4. Only recently a special issue of Outre-mers was entitled “Vichy and Its Colonies.” Two articles in this volume deal with FWA, but both limit themselves to specific issues: Pierre Ramognino dwells upon the tools of repression used by the regime in West Africa, especially against the French enemies of the National Revolution, and Vincent Joly discusses the military effort in French Sudan between 1940 and 1942. See Ramognino, “Le pétainisme”; Joly, “‘Se defender contre quiconque?’”

5. Akpo-Vaché, L’AOF, 156–57.

6. Conklin, A Mission to Civilize.

7. Ten people were interviewed. Most of them belonged to the Western-educated elite, although none was a French citizen. All except one lived in Dakar during the war.


Part 1. FWA and Its Place in the Vichy Colonial Idea

1. Qtd. in La Légion, Aug. 1940.


1. Setting the Stage for Vichy

1. For an overview of the variety of peoples and cultures in this vast region, see Conklin, A Mission to Civilize, 25–30.

2. The colonial council in 1920 replaced the general council (conseil général), which included twenty members chosen by the African citizens of the four communes of Senegal. The colonial council included forty-four members; eighteen of them represented the citizens, and twenty-six were chosen by canton or province chiefs who were not citizens. The chiefs received precise orders from the colonial administration with regard to their voting, and thus the administration could control the council. See Morgenthau, Political Parties, 127.

3. During the Vichy period Upper Volta was part of Côte d’Ivoire. It became a separate territory again in 1946.

4. Morgenthau, Political Parties, 1.

5. Johnson, “African Political Activity,” 542.

6. Morgenthau, Political Parties, 125.

7. Cohen, “Colonial Policy of the Popular Front,” 368.

8. Lydon, “Women, Children,” 171.

-191-

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French Colonialism Unmasked: The Vichy Years in French West Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • Part I - French West Africa and Its Place in the Vichy Colonial Idea 1
  • 1 - Setting the Stage for Vichy 3
  • 2 - "A Source of Pride and Greatness" 11
  • Part II 23
  • 3 - Vichy Settles In- Administrative Changes and Continuity 25
  • 4 - Spreading the National Revolution in FWA 33
  • 5 - "Thinking Big" 59
  • Part III 87
  • 6 - Vichy and the "Products" of Assimilation 93
  • 7 - The Vichy Regime and the "Traditional" Elements of African Society 117
  • 8 - Vichy Colonialism and African Society 153
  • Part IV 159
  • 9 - Vichy Colonialism 161
  • 10 - Vichy''s Postwar Impact 173
  • Conclusions 183
  • Notes 191
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 231
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