Bridging the Divide: My Life

By Edward W. Brooke | Go to book overview

9
The Strange Case of the Boston Strangler

These days murder in our cities is distressingly commonplace, but forty years ago, seemingly random killings were a unique phenomenon. The notorious killer who became known as the Boston Strangler first struck on June 14, 1962, when he strangled a fifty-six-year-old housewife with her own bathrobe sash. Every few weeks thereafter, continuing through January 4, 1964, another woman was strangled to death in her own home in or around Boston. Eventually, eleven murders were directly attributed to this elusive killer. Because there were no signs of forced entry, it was believed that either the killer knew the women or had talked his way into their homes. He strangled the women, often sexually violated them, and left their corpses in obscene poses. The initial victims were mostly older women of northern European ancestry, who led modest, respectable lives. The later victims were mostly younger. One was an African American. Most were assaulted from behind and strangled, often with their own stockings, which were left tied in a bow. The details suggested strongly that we were not dealing with a burglar surprised by the presence of victims but with a psychopath.

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Bridging the Divide: My Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Inside the Cocoon 4
  • 2 - Captain Carlo 20
  • 3 - Romance in Italy 32
  • 4 - Law and Politics 43
  • 5 - "Where the Huckleberries Grow" 54
  • 6 - The Boston Finance Commission 71
  • 7 - One Vote in Worcester 80
  • 8 - Attorney General 96
  • 9 - The Strange Case of the Boston Strangler 115
  • 10 - Running for the Senate 129
  • 11 - Back to Washington 145
  • 12 - Vietnam 154
  • 13 - Member of the Club 169
  • 14 - The President Nixon I Knew 187
  • 15 - "The Freest Man in the Senate" 212
  • 16 - A Private Matter 235
  • 17 - Stormy Weather 243
  • 18 - Love and Redemption 259
  • 19 - Private Citizen 274
  • 20 - Looking beyond 289
  • Index 309
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