Bridging the Divide: My Life

By Edward W. Brooke | Go to book overview

13
Member of the Club

During my first years in the Senate I spent a lot of time on airplanes. In April 1967, only a month after my return from Southeast Asia, I flew to Israel to lay the cornerstone of the aeronautical wing of the Amal Comprehensive Trade School, in the city of Beersheba, not far from the Sea of Galilee. The Boston Committee of Histadrut, the Israeli Federation of Labor Committee, had honored me in the fall of 1966 with the organization’s Brotherhood Award for my support of technical education in Israel, and this wing of the school had been named for me.

During this, my first trip to Israel, Remigia and I visited the Tomb of David and the room of the Last Supper. We walked through the streets of Nazareth where Christ had walked. I was moved by the holy places and impressed by what the Israelis had done to transform a desert into a land of plenty. Being so close to the site of PalestinianIsraeli conflict gave me a new perspective on the East-West arms race and the influence of the superpower rivalry on international conflicts. After meeting with Israeli President Zalman Shazer and Prime Minister Levi Eshkol, I boarded a plane for a brief visit to Greece and was the first American official to visit there since the military coup.

My globetrotting soon inspired derision. Critics said I was trying to be a one-man State Department. The Boston Herald warned that I was “playing a dangerous game.” Cartoonist Paul Szep depicted me

-169-

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Bridging the Divide: My Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Inside the Cocoon 4
  • 2 - Captain Carlo 20
  • 3 - Romance in Italy 32
  • 4 - Law and Politics 43
  • 5 - "Where the Huckleberries Grow" 54
  • 6 - The Boston Finance Commission 71
  • 7 - One Vote in Worcester 80
  • 8 - Attorney General 96
  • 9 - The Strange Case of the Boston Strangler 115
  • 10 - Running for the Senate 129
  • 11 - Back to Washington 145
  • 12 - Vietnam 154
  • 13 - Member of the Club 169
  • 14 - The President Nixon I Knew 187
  • 15 - "The Freest Man in the Senate" 212
  • 16 - A Private Matter 235
  • 17 - Stormy Weather 243
  • 18 - Love and Redemption 259
  • 19 - Private Citizen 274
  • 20 - Looking beyond 289
  • Index 309
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