A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Chronology of Events

1949

April 4: The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is established.


1950

February 14: The Soviet Union and China sign the Treaty of Friendship, Alliance, and Mutual Assistance in Moscow.


1954

October 20–23: Western foreign ministers meeting in Paris agree to end West Germany's occupation status, and invite it to become a part of NATO.

November 29: The Soviets convene a meeting in Moscow to discuss establishing an all-European security system. The Western governments decline to attend, leaving eight communist countries which would eventually form the Warsaw Treaty Organization.


1955

May 9: West Germany joins NATO.

May 14: Eight Soviet bloc states sign the Warsaw Treaty. The signatories—Albania, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Hungary, East Germany, Poland, Romania, and the Soviet Union—are joined by China, North Korea and North Vietnam as observers.

May 15: The Soviet Union and the Western powers sign the Austrian State Treaty providing for Austrian neutrality.

July 18–23: The USSR, France, Great Britain and the United States hold a summit in Geneva. Soviet Premier Nikolai A. Bulganin presents the draft of an allEuropean security treaty.


1956

January 18: The East German army is created.

January 27–28: The first meeting of the Political Consultative Committee (PCC) takes place in Prague. The group approves a Soviet-designed Statute of the Unified Command. It decides to create a commission on foreign policy coordination as well as a Secretariat but does not implement the decision.

February 25: At the CPSU XXth Congress, Khrushchev delivers the "secret speech" in which he denounces Stalin and his crimes.

October 19: Khrushchev and several Soviet Politburo members confront the Polish leadership led Władysław Gomułka over its "national communist" course, but Soviet military intervention is averted.

-xxv-

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