A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 11: East German Description of a West German
Plan for the Occupation of the GDR, July 29, 1959

This very interesting document, found in the East German archives, quotes verba- tim from a supposed West German record describing the occupation of the GDR in case of war. According to the memoirs of East German spy chief Markus Wolf, East German intelligence obtained it as early as 1955.6In 1959, during the first year of the Berlin crisis, the document was published to show the aggressive intentions of the FRG, but it was widely regarded in the West as a forgery and a propaganda move. The trouble with this interpretation is that the East Germans, as seen from their inter- nal documents, regarded the document as authentic, even though experts at the mil- itary archives in Freiburg continue to believe it was a fabrication. Another interest- ing detail is that the West Germans did not publicly respond when the document was first publicized. One possible explanation is that the West German paper was a draft or was prepared for background purposes somewhere in the Defense Ministry, and may never have become an official document. The important point is that the East German regime, whether or not it had justification, was genuinely worried about what might happen in the event of a military confrontation in Central Europe. In partic- ular, it feared that, unlike the experience of Hungary in 1956, the West would inter- vene if a similar uprising happened in the GDR, as indicated in this document. Clearly, East Germany's fragility and its leaders' concerns on that score were extremely impor- tant factors in determining Soviet bloc policy at the time of the Berlin crisis. The building of the Wall was suggestive of this sense of insecurity.


I.

1. The main goal of the German militarists and imperialists is the forcible seizure of the German Democratic Republic and the extension of NATO's sphere of influence as far as the Oder–Neisse border. "This is" the first step toward achievement of their revanchist demands—the restoration of the "Greater German Reich" and the "New European order"—under the hegemony of German imperialism, which poses at the same time an acute threat to the Soviet Union and all the socialist countries.

The aggressive goals of the occupation of the GDR are especially evident in the DECO II and Outline plans as well as the forced establishment of an aggressive army and its arming with nuclear weapons by 1961.

The Outline plan entails the strategic political conception of "limited war." The DECO II plan is a concrete elaboration of the planned military measures against the GDR.

6 Markus Wolf, Spionagechef im geheimen Krieg: Erinnerungen (Munich: Econ, 1997), p. 118.

-102-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.