A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 24: Mongolian Request for Admission
to the Warsaw Pact, July 15, 1963
By the early 1960s, the Sino-Soviet rift had taken on military implications. Because of its geographical location, Mongolia became a potential battleground between the two powers, the Soviet Union and China. Although Mongolian leader Tsedenbal, no friend of the Chinese, may have taken the initiative in applying for membership in the Warsaw Pact by writing this letter to Polish Premier Józef Cyrankiewicz, the history of his country's relationship with the Soviet Union—outsiders sometimes derisively called Mongolia the 16th republic of the USSR—makes it seem unlikely that he would have done so without at least strong support from Khrushchev. In that case, by raising the prospect of extending the validity of the Warsaw Pact beyond Europe to Asia, Khrush- chev may be seen as issuing a warning to the Chinese in the context of their increas- ingly bitter rivalry."…"Dear Comrade Chairman,With the authorization of the Presidium of the Supreme National Council of the Mongolian People's Republic "MNR", I have the honor to address to you, as Head of State of the Polish People's Republic, the custodian of the Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance between the European socialist states of May 14,1955, the following:In the interests of further strengthening the MNR's cooperation along all lines with the member-states of the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, the government of the Mongolian People's Republic,
attaching great importance to the Warsaw Treaty Organization, which in fact stands guard for the achievements of all the socialist states;
completely approving of the goal of the Treaty—to secure the peace and security of nations;
taking into consideration the development of events in numerous parts of the globe, in particular the Far East, where the American imperialists are undertaking measures to equip Japan with new weapons of mass destruction; "and"
realizing in this regard the need to strengthen the defensive capabilities of the MNR;
hereby announces its desire to accede to the Warsaw Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance of May 14, 1955, in accordance with Paragraph 9 of the said treaty.

By joining the Warsaw Treaty Organization, which bears a defensive character and has been called upon to serve the important interests of safeguarding collective security in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations Organization, the Mongolian People's Republic, along with the fraternal socialist member-states of the

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