A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 32: Transcript of Ceaușescu–Deng
Conversation, July 25, 1965

This account of a meeting between Nicolae Ceaușescu and Chinese Politburo member Deng Xiaoping describes aspects of Soviet policy toward the Warsaw Pact, but also gives telling indications of China's and Romania's viewpoints on the subject. Ceaușes- cu informs Deng that the Soviets want to reorganize the Warsaw Pact's command structure to tighten its centralized control but that Romania's position aims at making the alliance into a framework for more genuine collaboration between independent countries. Deng responds that the Chinese fully agree and expresses the hope that Ro- mania could serve as an intermediary between Beijing and the other East European countries. He suggests that Moscow should be made to apologize to the Albanians and allow them to rejoin the Warsaw Pact—which the Romanians subsequently tried to do but without success. The two leaders also discuss Vietnam at some length. Deng in- forms Ceaușescu that the Chinese are sending a letter to the Soviets concerning prob- lems of Soviet–Chinese cooperation in North Vietnam. One of Beijing's concerns is that a recent Soviet idea that both North and South Vietnam become neutral countries arose from an agreement between Moscow and Washington, of which the Chinese dis- approve, and which Deng sees as evidence of a Soviet desire to isolate China.

"…"

Comrade Nicolae Ceaușescu: "…" An issue raised by the Soviet comrades was the issue of the Warsaw Treaty Organization. In their view, toward the end of the year, a meeting of the Consultative Committee should take place due to the need to make some improvements regarding the organization of the military high command, with a view to ensuring broader participation by representatives of the other socialist countries in this high command. We told the Soviet comrades that we shall see. Since we have a common high command, it is to be assumed that the leadership of the current high command will also be joint. But the leadership of the current high command is Soviet. We shall see what proposals will be made. We had told them on other occasions that within the framework of this organization one must ensure that each army is independent, that each socialist country has an army of its own.

Comrade Ion Gheorghe Maurer: The relationships should be one of collaboration, of cooperation, not of subordination.

Comrade Nicolae Ceaușescu: We will analyze the proposals that will be made on that score.

Comrade Deng Xiaoping: This means the Soviets want to strengthen their control over the others.

Comrade Nicolae Ceaușescu: It is hard to say. The criticisms made so far were only about the fact that this command is Soviet. Naturally, they want to ensure a broader representative basis of the command, but we do not want only that and, mainly, not a "purely" formal representation, but really the organization of the command on

-192-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.