A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 41: Minutes of Summit of Warsaw Pact
Leaders in Bucharest, July 5–7, 1966

After a series of unproductive meetings of the allies, this PCC session finally produced agreement on certain issues important to the Soviets. The relatively free-wheeling dis- cussion prompted a senior Romanian official to later comment that this was the first high-level gathering where widely divergent views were both discussed and accepted. The issue of Vietnam prompted loud arguments between the Soviets, Romanians and Poles. At one point, Brezhnev became so upset at Ceaușescu —who had proposed 20 separate amendments to a Soviet declaration on the Vietnam War—that he threatened to sign the document even without Romania. Ceaușescu retorted that he would then publish his own declaration. Eventually the Poles and the Romanians agreed to remove some of their revisions and the document was finally signed.

Another major topic was European security. Again, the sides managed to reach a compromise that incorporated Romania's calls for the removal of foreign troops and bases and the dissolution of military blocs. The final agreement, the so-called Bucha- rest Declaration, did not invite United States participation in a planned European security conference, but did not explicitly exclude it either. Other subjects discussed in Bucharest included principles of exchanging information among Warsaw Pact part- ners and relations with China, including a recent meeting between Ceaușescu and Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai.

Record of the Statements of the Delegation Chiefs at the
Unofficial Meeting of first Secretaries and Premiers of the
Governments of Member-States of the Warsaw Treaty.

"…"

Brezhnev: "…" This morning we had an exchange of opinions regarding the possible inclusion in the text of the Declaration of a formulation proposed by Cde. Novotný regarding the accountability of the United States for damages due to the aggressive activities of the U.S. The Soviet delegation supports this proposal. Such a formulation would include two ideas. First, that all of us together with the Vietnamese nation run a ledger regarding losses inflicted on Vietnamese cities, villages, and industrial facilities, etc. from American bombings. And that the world society together with the Vietnamese nation will present such a bill to the American government, to the American aggressors.

Second thought—that world public opinion will come out with a political accusation against the American aggressors as war instigators, similar to the case of the Second World War against the Hitlerites.

Novotný: Stating his proposition precisely, said: We present the bill for material and human losses.

-225-

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