A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 46: Czechoslovak Report on the
Meeting of the Political Consultative Committee of
March 6–7, 1968, March 26, 1968

This meeting of the PCC is interesting in several respects. It was the first to be con- vened at Romania's initiative, the Romanian goal being to discuss both the ongoing conundrum of Warsaw Pact reorganization and one of the hot issues of the day—non- proliferation of nuclear weapons. The meeting also revealed aspects of the internal dynamics underway in Czechoslovakia at a time of growing political ferment in the country. As with earlier meetings, the Soviets were unable to achieve any satisfaction on alliance restructuring and the delegates once again shunted the matter off to high- er levels. Romania's main problem with Moscow concerning the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) was that the proposed document unduly favored the superpowers, which were already in basic agreement on the treaty's text. Bucharest also claimed that the NPT failed to offer sufficient safeguards for other countries because it did not commit the superpowers strongly enough to reductions of their nuclear stockpiles and did not include security guarantees for non-nuclear states, such as all the Soviet Union's Warsaw Pact allies. A contributing factor in the Romanians' opposition was their interest in closer ties with China, which also opposed the treaty as unduly advantageous to the Soviet Union.

At the head of the Czechoslovak delegation was party leader Alexander Dubček, who at the time was struggling to keep up with the wave of reforms sweeping through all levels of Czechoslovak society. What is notable is the fact that although reform of the Warsaw Pact was being debated internally within the Czechoslovak military and political leaderships, and even high-ranking officers held reservations about the way Moscow had been running the process, Dubček did not register any disagreements whatsoever at the meeting, choosing instead to show full support for the Soviet posi- tion (see Document No. 55 a). Prague radio nevertheless broadcast commentary about this meeting claiming that the Czechoslovaks had joined Romania in expressing doubts about the Soviet nuclear umbrella and drawing a comparison to French President Charles de Gaulle's criticism of the value of the U.S. nuclear commitment to his coun- try's security. However, there are no records from the conference indicating that any such comments were made. It is possible that the ongoing debates led the commenta- tor, liberal-minded journalist Luboš Dobrovský, to believe that objections to Soviet plans would be raised and wanted to report that they had been before receiving confirma- tion. In any case, the political leadership, very likely Dubček himself, clearly overruled any such notion, no doubt deciding that the wiser course, on this subject as on the NPT, would be to avoid giving Moscow further cause to question Prague's loyalty during a very fluid period.

-252-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.