A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 72: Minutes of Romanian Politburo Meeting
Concerning the Ceaușescu–Brezhnev Conversation, May 20, 1970

Several of the documents in this volume illuminate Romania's unique role as maver- ick within the Warsaw Pact. This report by Nicolae Ceaușescu to the Romanian Politburo about a meeting with Leonid Brezhnev gives a fascinating look—albeit from one side— at the personal relationships between the Romanian and Soviet leaders, and at Romanian opinions of the Soviets. Although he may tend to embellish his account, Ceaușescu probably also felt a need to be reasonably accurate in conveying such important infor- mation to his colleagues.

Not surprisingly, Brezhnev's main purpose at the meeting was to complain about Romania's position within the Warsaw Pact and its foreign policy in general. In his version of events, Ceaușescu refuted each point and regularly put the Soviets on the defensive. At one point, a Romanian official says, they turned green. The Romanians' contempt for the Soviet leadership comes through most starkly in the comments of Politburo member Emil Bodnăraș, who says they looked "pathetic" and displayed "complete incompetence and weakness," proving that they are "prisoners of the appa- ratus" and incapable of thinking independently.

This almost verbatim account of the Politburo discussion gives a vivid sense of the free-flowing, almost rambling quality of Ceaușescu's speech and shows how he dom- inated the discussions behind closed doors.

"…"

Cde. N. Ceaușescu: "…" We spoke first and, for a little more than an hour we spoke, in the spirit of our discussion here in the Executive Committee, regarding some of our general concerns; of course, stressing economic problems. "…" Then Brezhnev started speaking. He began with a history of the relationship between the CPSU and the PCR, saying that there were many positive elements: he mentioned the exchanges of delegations in the past year—seven from us, participation in ideological reunions by them. There were also exchanges of technical documentation—they gave us 3,000 pages and we gave them 1,200—as well as cultural exchanges, what we gave them and what they gave us. "Brezhnev said" there are issues of common interest, that both they and we appreciate the leading role of the party. After that he said that there are also a number of disagreements, especially as concerned the political realm. And he began by saying that that is a consequence of the fact that Romania's position is opposed to that of the socialist countries. Of course, it is the right of every party to establish its own general political line, the direction of its foreign policy, but that on vital issues we should come to a consensus. There are instances in which Romania took a common position, but there are issues on which Romania did not act in common and even acted demonstratively.

Cde. Ștefan Voicu: Twice or three times he underlined "demonstratively."

-365-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.